Student Supports

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Student Supports

Additional Supports for the Individual Sensory Profile of Each Student

  1. SENSORY AND MOTOR MODULATION AND INTEGRATION ACTIVITIES
    Sensory modulation is when the senses work together. Each sense works with the others to form a composite picture of who we are physically, where we are and what is going on around us. Sensory modulation is a neurological function that is responsible for producing this composite picture. It is the organization of sensory information for ongoing use.

    • Vestibular stimulating activities: This refers to the information that is provided by the receptors within the inner ear. It is concerned with the perception of movement and gravity as well as the development of spatial awareness, balance, equilibrium, postural control and muscle tone. It is also considered to be an important center for bilateral coordination and the development of lateralization.
      • Rolling games
      • Spinning games (swing, scooter boards)
      • Ball games (bouncing on ball)
      • Trampoline workout (bounce sitting, run in place, jump)
    • Proprioceptive stimulating activities

      Promise me you’ll always remember: You’re braver than you believe and stronger than you seem and smarter than you think.  — Christopher Robin to Pooh Bear

      • Heavy load walks and hiking trips
        • Wearing heavy weighted vests
        • Crawl or creep with heavy weights
      • Cocooning – wrapping child in tight sheet or blanket and hold like a caterpillar in a cocoon
      • Climbing mattresses or blow-up pillows
      • Pulling a wagon filled with heavy books, pushing a wagon with heavy objects, carrying objects from one place to another
      • Animal walks
      • Body wheelbarrow walks
    • Motor planning: Child’s ability to organize, plan and then execute new and unpracticed fine motor or gross motor activity
      • Balance beams
      • Obstacle courses
      • Problem solving within motor tasks
  2. PERCEPTUAL MOTOR CHALLENGES 
    • Throwing
    • Catching
    • Crossing midline
    • Kicking and hitting balls
    • Drawing (paper and pencil mazes)
  3. PRAXIS ACTIVITIES
    • Ideation
    • Motor planning
    • Execution
  4. TACTILE DISCRIMINATION 
    • Finding objects hidden in beans, rice, birdseed
    • Hiding in a pillow case
  5. STRUCTURED TEACHING STRATEGIES
    *When needed for children with significant motor challenges (to be used at the discretion of the staff and modified to include affect and meaning).
  6. SPEECH AND LANGUAGE CAPACITIES
    *See our section on developmental language models

 

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